TIF

By [email protected]
October 05, 2016
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication (TIF) is a new procedure that is being performed by our physicians at Easton Hospital for GERD.  Click on the attached link to read an article from the Morning Call about this fantastic new procedure.

http://www.mcall.com/news/local/easton/mc-easton-hospital-acid-reflux-fix-20161002-story.html

By [email protected]
October 05, 2016
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged
Coming soon.
By [email protected]
August 15, 2014
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Illnesses Treated by Gastroenterologists

In addition to rare disorders of the digestive system, gastroenterologists diagnose or treat the following common conditions:

  • Colorectal cancer, including determining whether you have a genetic risk
  • Viral hepatitis
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis
  • Diverticulitis, diverticulosis and ischemic bowel disease
  • Celiac disease and food intolerances
  • Heartburn and GERD
  • Chronic vomiting and gastroparesis
  • Functional illness, such as constipation, diarrhea, vomiting, belching and flatulence
  • Peptic ulcer disease and Helicobacter pylori
  • Acute and chronic pancreatitis
  • Gallbladder disease
  • Appendicitis
  • Nutritional deficiencies
  • Obesity
  • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
  • Cirrhosis
  • GI infections caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa

If you have any of these conditions, a gastroenterologist is the best physician for you to see

 

Source: http://www.gastro.org/patient-center/about-gastroenterology#illnesses

 

Tests Performed by a GI Doctor

Gastroenterologists use a number of techniques to view the organs of the digestive tract. The most common tests they perform are colonoscopy and upper-GI endoscopy.

Colonoscopy is performed to examine the large intestine for disease, most commonly colorectal cancer. Everyone age 50 and older should be screened for colorectal cancer. When performing a colonoscopy, the gastroenterologist uses a long, thin, flexible tube with a tiny video camera and a light on the end — called the colonoscope — to view the entire colon and rectum and check for polyps, inflammatory changes or cancer. If polyps are found, they often can be removed with this procedure.

Endoscopy can be helpful in the evaluation or diagnosis of various problems, including difficult or painful swallowing, pain in the stomach or abdomen, bleeding, ulcers, tumors, and problems with the gallbladder, pancreas and bile ducts. An endoscope is a long, thin, flexible tube with a tiny video camera and light on the end. By adjusting the controls on the endoscope, the gastroenterologist can safely guide the instrument to carefully examine the inside lining of the upper digestive system. In some cases, GIs can treat digestive conditions through the endoscope.

Some gastroenterologists perform newer tests to examine the GI tract, such as CT colonography where the GI doctor can inspect radiological images of the colon to check for polyps and cancers, and capsule endoscopy, during which the patient swallows a camera that records images of the GI tract.

For digestive health issues, it’s best to see a doctor who specializes in the digestive tract — a gastroenterologist.

By [email protected]
August 15, 2014
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Gallstone pain is one of the most common reasons patients visit emergency rooms. Figuring out who needs emergency gallbladder removal and who can go home and schedule surgery at their convenience is sometimes a tricky question, and it isn't always answered correctly. A new Mayo Clinic study found that 1 in 5 patients who went to the emergency room with gallbladder pain and were sent home to schedule surgery returned to the ER within 30 days needing emergency gallbladder removal. The surgical complication rate rises with the time lag before surgery, the researchers say.

"It makes a big difference if you get the right treatment at the right time," says co-lead author Juliane Bingener-Casey, M.D., a gastroenterologic surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. The study is published in the Journal of Surgical Research.

Often it's obvious who needs emergency gallbladder removal, a procedure known as cholecystectomy, who can delay it and who doesn't need surgery at all. But sometimes patients fall into a gray area. Mayo researchers are working to develop a reliable tool to help determine the best course of action in those cases, and the newly published study is a first step, Dr. Bingener-Casey says.

How to handle gallstone patients is a cost and quality issue in health care. In the United States, 1 in 10 women and 1 in 15 men have gallstones, and more than 1 million people a year are hospitalized for gallstone disease. The fatty food common in U.S. diets is a contributing factor, Dr. Bingener-Casey says.

ER visits and emergency surgery are typically more expensive than scheduled surgeries. In addition to cost issues, patients often prefer the convenience of scheduling surgery, so they can arrange child care and leave from work, for example. But delaying a needed gallbladder removal more than six days increases the surgical complication rate and may make patients likelier to need open-abdomen surgery rather than a minimally invasive laparoscopic procedure, the researchers noted.

"Gallbladder disease is very frequent and it's one of the most expensive diseases for the nation as a whole. If we can get that right the first time, I think we can make things better for a lot of people," Dr. Bingener-Casey says.

Researchers studied the billing records of 3,138 patients at Mayo in Rochester between 2000 and 2013 who went to the emergency department for abdominal pain within 30 days before gallbladder surgery. Of those, 1,625 were admitted for emergency gallbladder surgery, and 1,513 were allowed to go home and schedule surgery at a later date. Of the patients who went home, 20 percent came back to the emergency room within a month needing a cholecystectomy urgently, and of those, 55 percent were back in the ER within a week for emergency surgery.

Among those discharged from the ER, younger patients who were otherwise healthy and older patients who did have other health problems were likelier than people in their 40s and 50s to return to the emergency room within a month and need gallbladder removal urgently, the study found. That suggests that younger patients, older patients and those with other serious medical conditions may benefit from a second look before they are discharged from the emergency room, the researchers say.

Researchers analyzed test results typically considered indicators of gallbladder disease including white blood cell count, temperature and heart rate and saw no difference between those who left the ER and didn't make a repeat visit and those who left the emergency room only to come back within a month. Such metrics may be incorporated into a decision tool if they hold up during future research. 

 

 

Source:http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/280903.php

 

By Twin Rivers Gastroenterology Center
May 07, 2014
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Hepatitis B  

Our office currently has the Hepatitis B Vaccination. The American Association of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a Hepatitis B vaccination for patients with chronic liver disease especially Hepatitis C.  These vaccinations are done in three doses: first injection followed by booster doses at months 1 and 6. 

Please call our office at (610)258-6635 for more information.

By Twin Rivers Gastroenterology
April 29, 2014
Category: None
Tags: Untagged

Welcome to the Blog of Twin Rivers Gastroenterology

Twin Rivers Gastroenterology would like to welcome you to our blog. Here you will find informative and useful postings about gastroenterology and our practice.

At Twin Rivers Gastroenterology we believe that educated patients are better prepared to make decisions regarding the health of their digestive system.  Our blog was designed to provide you with the latest gastroenterology developments and valuable health advice from our dedicated team. 

Twin Rivers Gastroenterology hopes you find our blog to be a great resource for keeping up to date with proper digestive health care and treatments.





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